Why Does the World Need Apolla?

Because we are here to help you feel better. 

The dancer is an artist and an athlete. In traditional sports athletes have begun to emphasize protecting their bodies so that they may increase their performance output. However, the dancer's mentality is "no pain no gain" translates to us not protecting ourselves as we continue to test the limits of our bodies. This practice leads to an elevated level of preventable injuries.  Scientific dance research has shown why we need to make a fundamental shift in how we take care of our bodies.
*References listed below
  • The opinion in the current literature related is that dance footwear is inadequate for protecting the foot and could be a risk factor for injury to the foot and ankle.
  • “Dancers are highly trained athletes who are at significant risk for injury due to intense competition and the repetitive nature of their movement patterns.”
  • Dancers have a lifetime injury incidence of up to 90%.
  • It has been hypothesized that the soft ballet technique shoe does not have sufficient energy absorbing qualities and that this deficiency might lead to injury due to the highly repetitive forces in dance.
  • The requirements of dance styles cannot be modified too greatly; footwear should be designed to minimize impact forces and injury risk of dancers and to assist them in achieving maximal performance.

Apolla gives you the how on taking care of our bodies. Starting with our foundation...our feet. Learn more about the special features the Apolla Shock® will provide a dancer:

Why Apolla Traction?

  • It appears that currently there is a trade off between the “feel the floor” provided by the soft technique shoe and the need for cushioning and energy absorption of the foot.

Our revolutionary traction not only allows you the perfect balance of grip and glide, but it also has vibration-dampening properties adding to the energy absorption value. Our traction allows you to “feel the floor” and cushion your feet…so there is no trade off!


Why Compression Arch Support?

  • Dancers are exposed to many landings from jumps during class, performance, and repetitive loading has been linked with an increased risk of injury.
  • Taping and bandaging assist in injury prevention recovery, improved performance, decreased pain, and return to activity.
    • Compression is a form of this.
  • The influence of compression following eccentric exercise has also been found to prevent a loss of range of motion (ROM), decrease perceived soreness, reduce swelling, and promote recovery of force production.
  • Some researchers hypothesize that repetitively landing jumps and leaps…exposes dancers to high impact forces that may contribute to musculoskeletal injuries, including premature osteoarthritis, medial tibial stress syndrome, and stress fractures.
    • These injuries may end a performer’s career and result in permanent disability.

With our knowledge of anatomy and kinesiology we focused on the key areas of the foot to help lift and support the arch. Using sport science technology and targeted compression to accentuate the arch the compression also helps with circulation and optimal blood flow.


Why Energy Absorption?

  • Ballet jump landings are associated with ground reaction forces of 4 to 13 times body weight.
  • Hard floors when used in dance have been suggested to influence injury risk.
  • Increased underfoot pressure has been shown to be a strong predictor of overuse injury in active young people.
  • High impact forces are known to increase the risk of shin splints and stress fractures.
  • Poorly fitted shoes, the lack of adequate energy absorbing materials in footwear and high-heeled shoes have all been identified as being causes of injury.

With innovative knit energy absorption you are able have the comfort under the balls of your feet and help lessen the jolt sent through the body's joints and muscles with every landing.


 Why Ankle Stability?

  • Based on the physical demands placed on dancers (e.g., extreme ranges of motion, dancing en pointe and demi-pointe, adjusting to different choreographic styles, repetitive nature of class structure, and lack of an “off” season), the prevalence of ankle injuries may be exceptionally great in the dance population.
  • Especially in association with increased loading at the ankle joint during drop landings.
  • Latereral ankle sprain is the most common acute injury in sport and dance.
  • Foot and ankle injuries account for between 53% and 65% of all injuries in professional dancers.

With reinforced compression in the ankle we hope to help you build strength and stabilize the ankle with added support.


  ...And One More Statistic...

  • The injury rates for dancers are approximately 65% repetitive use and 35% traumatic injury.
    • Majority of injuries occur in lower extremities of which 42% are foot and ankle injuries.
We can’t prevent the acute and traumatic injuries…but we look to help support the overused muscles and strained dancer using compression, arch support, energy absorption and traction. By bringing the world a new dance shoe we are changing the way a dancer can take care of themselves, changing the mentality that we need pain to progress. At the same time, keeping the traditional look and even enhancing how we see our feet on stage.
 
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